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The Louisiana Coalition for Alternatives to the Death Penalty is a grassroots coalition dedicated to achieving non-violent and effective alternatives to the death penalty. We recognize that Louisiana’s death penalty is socially, racially and economically unjust. We believe that the state’s limited resources should be channeled into local communities to prevent crime and better support families affected by murder.


 

New Year, New Milestone: 2015 Marks Five Years in Louisiana without an Execution

This week – January 7, 2015 – marks five years since Louisiana’s most recent execution.  LCADP takes the opportunity to commemorate this date by thanking the countless activists, advocates, lawyers, and engaged citizens whose hard work has helped us reach this milestone.  Our work is far from done, but we pause to appreciate how far we have come and to reenergize ourselves for the work that still remains.

In addition to five years without an execution – and perhaps more significantly – Louisiana has seen a significant decline in death sentences over the same period.  Since 2010, there have been 11 death sentences handed down in Louisiana.  This figure constitutes an 80% decline compared to the peak from 1995 to 1999, when there were 56 death sentences. 

LCADP’s partnership with communities of faith and individuals representing defendants facing execution has helped inform people in Louisiana about the fallibility of the justice system.  Even Louisiana, which used to lead the nation per capita in executions, has begun to recognize that the death penalty is excessive, and that life without parole at Angola Penitentiary is a very harsh punishment. 

The broad impetus for this change arises from the understanding that mistakes occur.  Per capita, Louisiana is among the leading states in the country in wrongful convictions, and when Glenn Ford was released from death row in 2014 after 30 years, he was the longest serving death row inmate exonerated in the country.  People in Louisiana also recognize that the resources expended defending and prosecuting death penalty cases are better spent on victim services, crime reduction, and addressing unsolved crime.  

LCADP’s work will continue in 2015 and the years to come, and we hope you’ll join us!

 

News


Looking back on 2014

LCADP is proud of our accomplishments over the past year. Thanks to the hard work of our friends in the capital defense community death sentences are decreasing and because of our education and advocacy initiatives opposition to the death penalty is increasing.

We still have a lot of work to do, and the road to abolition starts here! During this season of generosity, please consider financially supporting LCADP.  Your donations allow us to run education initiatives in communities and schools, activate allies in death-prone parishes and express your opposition to the death penalty at the state capitol. Visit our support page to donate or click here!

 

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Glenn Ford Becomes Louisiana's 10th Death Row Exoneree

Prosecutors Join Defense in Motion to Vacate Conviction; Believe Another Man Committed Crime

Glenn Ford sat on Louisiana's death row for nearly 30 years for a crime he did not commit. Caddo Parish prosecutors recently agreed to join the defense in asking to vacate Ford's conviction and death sentence, stating in their motion to a Caddo court that:

"the state now believes whatever the involvement of Glenn Ford in the robbery or murder of Isadore Rozeman, the new information, if known at the time of the trial, would reasonably have resulted in a different outcome. … Indeed, if the information had been within the knowledge of the state, Glenn Ford might not even have been arrested or indicted for this offense.”

According to Andrew Cohen at The Atlantic, Ford is one of the longest-serving death row inmates in modern American history to be exonerated and released. Cohen condemns the system that wrongfully put Ford on death row in the first place:

"Prosecutors believe the recent account of a confidential informant who claims that one of other four original co-defendants in the case, arrested long ago along with Ford, was actually the person who shot and killed Rozeman. This is not news to Ford. For three decades, stuck in inhumane conditions on death row in the state's notorious Angola prison, he has insisted that he had nothing to do with the murder and that he was involved in the case only after the fact. 

Any exoneration is remarkable, of course. Any act of justice after decades of injustice is laudable. It is never too late to put to right a wrong. But what also is striking about this case is how weak it always was, how frequently Ford's constitutional rights were denied, and yet how determined Louisiana's judges were over decades to defend an indefensible result."

Caddo Parish continues to try more capital cases and sentence more people to death in the State of Louisiana than any other parish.


Nachitoches Man Willard Allen Has Conviction and Death Sentence Overturned

Court Allowed Biased Juror to Sit on Jury

The Associated Press reports that U.S. District Judge Dee D. Drell of Alexandria granted Willard Allen's petition to have his 1994 murder conviction and death sentence overturned on February 17, 2014 after finding that a biased juror was allowed to sit on Allen's jury.

The federal judge found that the juror could not consider giving Allen a life sentence and was "never otherwise rehabilitated, nor did he ever indicate he would weigh the evidence and/or decide the case fairly and impartially." The Court ruled, "Accordingly, we find petitioner's unreliable conviction cannot be the basis for criminal punishment, much less a sentence of death. ... he has met his burden to have that conviction vacated and for a new trial."

According to the Associated Press,

Drell returned the case to state court with instructions to conduct a bail hearing within 45 days of the judgment. In addition, the state has 270 days to decide whether to retry the case. If that doesn't happen, the judge said, the state must "unconditionally discharge petitioner from custody," he wrote.

Read the entire article here.


Juries Reject the Death Penalty in Louisiana

Since the beginning of 2012, Louisiana juries have repeatedly rejected the death penalty in capital trials, reflecting a national trend in declining numbers of new death sentences. There was only 1 new death sentence in Louisiana in 2012 (a resentence) and 2 new death sentences in 2013. All of these came from a single parish, Caddo Parish.

In the cases of Kenneth Barnes (Orleans Parish), Samuel Jordan (Caddo Parish), Christopher Cope (Caddo Parish), Daniel Prince (Acadia Parish), and Barry Edge (St. Tammany) defendants were sentenced to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole rather than the death penalty following the sentencing phase of their capital trials.

Nationally, death sentences are at an all-time low. The number of new death sentences in 2014 was the lowest in the modern era of the death penalty.

Read more about the national trends in DPIC's 2014 End of Year Report.


 


Showing 13 reactions

  • commented 2015-01-07 10:57:15 -0600
    vengeance in the name of justice – a barbaric, inhumane and CRUEL punishment which our Bill of Rights forbids and which a moral society deplores

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  • commented 2015-01-03 21:56:20 -0600
    From all indications, America could be safer without the death penalty and would realize an enormous monetary saving as well. Judging by the crime rates in those states that have abolished capital punishment and instituted alternative sentences, the absence of the death penalty would cause no rise in the murder rate.Capital murderers would not be released after serving only seven years. Hundreds of millions of dollars and thousands of hours of court time would be saved by replacing the death penalty with alternative sentences. The money saved could be devoted to crime prevention measures which really do reduce crime and violence and thus are the true alternatives to the death penalty.

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  • commented 2014-12-29 00:29:31 -0600
    I have few objections on that. Turning down the death penalties may be cause to imbalance equation. If turn-down the death penalties then what other alternatives you suggest. Should that person prison for the life time. What is the guarantee that he/she will not such type of crime again. I think in case of better suggestion things can be in your favor.

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  • commented 2014-12-15 01:11:58 -0600
    Accessory after the fact. That’s what people are that don’t want proper justice to be served on people that have committed cruel and horrible murder on innocent persons.

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  • commented 2014-12-10 12:02:07 -0600
    I am also for the total abolition of all death penalties in all states and even in all countries. It is completely inhumane and belongs to the middle ages, not our modern society. http://www.norgesautomaten.cc
  • commented 2014-11-28 14:14:47 -0600
    My uncle has sat behind bars for 22 years for a crime he did not commit. The entire case was a crooked debacle from the district attorney down. The shame is that Gabriel Clark still walks around free? They had no evidence to charge him with the crime. If you read the case files, anyone with a 7th grade education can see the mis-use of the justice system. The confession came under fixed and unscrupulous surroundings. Trial conviction of murder in a day, yeah ok?

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  • commented 2014-11-13 05:06:35 -0600
    I strongly condemn death penalty and it is very inhuman. As per http://secstates.net death penalty should be avoided at all cost.
  • commented 2014-10-16 04:00:38 -0500 · Flag
    In several cases death penalty is nothing just the right decision by the court but its time to revise the law and must have clear that what crime needs to the death penalty. http://www.equipacionesdefutbolbaratas2015.es/
  • commented 2014-10-13 02:44:06 -0500
    Soon our free country will see the death penalty for what it is – vengeance in the name of justice – a barbaric, inhumane and CRUEL punishment which our Bill of Rights forbids and which a moral society deplores

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  • commented 2014-09-29 00:01:51 -0500 · Flag
    Salute to you and the effort yo guys have put on.

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  • commented 2014-09-10 03:51:19 -0500 · Flag
    Accessory after the fact. That’s what people are that don’t want proper justice to be served on people that have committed cruel and horrible murder on innocent persons.
  • commented 2014-06-26 20:08:18 -0500 · Flag
    Soon our free country will see the death penalty for what it is – vengeance in the name of justice – a barbaric, inhumane and CRUEL punishment which our Bill of Rights forbids and which a moral society deplores. Whatever the crime, no matter how heinous, life without parole is punishment enough.
  • commented 2014-06-05 02:22:44 -0500
    In several cases death penalty is nothing just the right decision by the court but its time to revise the law and must have clear that what crime needs to the death penalty. For that purpose all the organization of human rights and other stake holders must be joined the reform so the effectiveness of the law will be increased in that case. Some how its good to bring awareness among the people and about the alternatives. http://airconditioner-notcooling.com/ appreciate your efforts in that context.